It was a fittingly sunny afternoon to discuss the power of light when around 130 people, from confessed computing experts to young scientists of the future, gathered in Perth last week to learn how big data and big ideas are translated into real life benefits by experts at the Australian Synchrotron and across the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)’s suite of world-class landmark research infrastructure.

 

At the ‘Big data + big ideas = real-life benefits’ lecture, Australian Synchrotron Director Professor Andrew Peele showed dazzling rich-colour images that shed insight into the mind-bending computing behind the real-life benefits delivered through the Australian Synchrotron: from peeling back the surface of priceless artworks to de-clogging inkjet printers, and from enriching the nutrients in essential foods to pharmaceutical breakthrough that are changing the lives of people with cancers and coeliac and Alzheimer’s diseases.

 

Embarking on a ‘deep dive’ into the mechanics of big data, Dr Andreas Moll, Senior Scientific Software Engineer, took the audience through the creation of a one gigapixel image, from data collection and processing to stitching and reconstruction. Incredibly, Dr Moll told guests that technical upgrades to key equipment on one of the facility’s ten beamlines will see data acquisition that currently takes 15 minutes, reduced to only 18 seconds accelerating health and medical research.

 

In a further nod to the future, Professor Peele explained how advances in synchrotron technology are rapidly outpacing increases in the speed of conventional computing devices, paving the way for new investment at the landmark research facility that will massively expand the ability of Australian Synchrotron scientists to translate its torrents of data into improvements in the way we work, eat and live, through partnership with academic researchers and industry clients from across Australia, New Zealand and around the world.

 

Hosted by Dr Erica Smyth, Deputy Chair of ANSTO and Chair of the WA Mega Data Cluster and emceed by Dr Miles Apperley, Head of Research Infrastructure at ANSTO, the lecture left a buzz in the air at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research with one guest describing the display of technical know-how as ‘brain-blasting’. 

 

Click here to download the 'Big ideas + big data = real life benefits' presentation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Professor Natalie Sims, leader of the research team, with Christina Vrahnas, first author on the Bone journal paper.

 

Melbourne researchers have used the Australian Synchrotron to reveal  how bone made in people taking hormone treatment for advanced osteoporosis is likely to be stronger and more durable than previously thought, offering new insights into skeletal diseases and ways of predicting who may be at risk of fractures and breaks.

 

The experimental technique, developed by researchers from St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research (SVI) in Melbourne and revealed online in Bone ahead of appearing in the December edition, uses infrared synchrotron light to monitor tiny sections of newly-formed bone at different times, in conditions mimicking the human body, influenced by parathyroid hormone treatment (PTH) or teriparatide.

 

SVI’s Associate Professor Natalie Sims, leader of the research team, says PTH is one of very few recommended second-line treatments for people with serious bone diseases, including osteoporosis.

 

‘PTH stimulates the production of new bone when bone fragility persists after first-line treatments fail, but previous studies suggested this replacement bone was not as strong as existing bone which, in turn, was thought to be behind ongoing fractures and breaks in people who had daily PTH injections.

 

‘Not only has our analysis shown replacement bone has exactly the composition and structure that it should, our investigative technique opens the door to previously impossible bone examination, which could shed new light on all skeletal diseases including osteogenesis imperfecta and osteomalacia.’

 

Associate Professor Sims says using the Australian Synchrotron, landmark research infrastructure of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), gave the research team new appreciation of how bones regrow, in unprecedented detail and accuracy.

 

‘When bone forms, collagen is laid down in a matrix, in which calcium builds over time in a process called mineralisation – it is crucial that we can probe deep into the bone matrix because on the surface, just like wood, both weak and strong bone can look exactly the same.

 

‘Moreover, the ability to analyse tiny bone sections only 15 microns across – about the size of two blood cells – meant we could go deeper and deeper into older and older bone in tiny increments, to identify structural differences: clues as to which bone was truly strong and which was truly weak.’

 

Professor Peter Ebeling AO, Head, Department of Medicine, Monash University at Monash Health says the new avenue of bone research could lead to improved diagnostic tests and approaches to predicting breaks and fractures.

 

‘Current bone density tests are quite good at telling us who is at most risk of fractures but, in many cases, they do not tell the full story.

 

‘By looking at tiny samples, as opposed to centimetres-long bone sections, it will be tremendous if this research can help inform a more precise and useful approach, as well as assisting with testing the efficacy of future, improved bone disease drugs that are able to build new bone.’

 

Media coverage

Professor Andrew Peele, Director of the Australian Synchrotron and Dr Sarawut Sujitjorn, Director of the Synchrotron Light Research Institute of Thailand, at Clayton in Victoria.

 

A new era of regional scientific cooperation begun this week with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in Clayton between the Australian Synchrotron and the Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI) of Thailand. 

Over a two-day visit, which involved a tour of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL), roundtable discussions and an official dinner, executive board members of SLRI learned about the history, operations and future of the Australian Synchrotron, which will inform the development of the 1.2 GeV Siam Photon Laboratory (SPL), the first synchrotron facility in Thailand.

Discussions covered approaches to safety and risk, plans for expansion and business development and the broad range of supporting services ensuring the landmark ANSTO research infrastructure continues to go from strength to strength.

Future cooperation enabled by the MoU could involve the sharing of brainpower and expertise, as the Thai delegation expressed a desire to cooperate on a staff exchange program with the Australian Synchrotron.