The Australian Synchrotron regularly features in articles published in Chemistry in Australia, the magazine of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute.

Articles published since April 2010 are:

Drug delivery under investigation

‘No drugs on the market consist of drug alone, Drug delivery is all about what we put in with the drug so that it can go to the right place in the right quantity at the right time to elicit the best therapeutic effect.' Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, February 2013, pp 24-27.
Click here for pdf (715kb)

The Australian Synchrotron five years on

In just five years of user operations, more than 3000 researchers from 186 organisations and 27 countries have made a combined total of 10 000 visits to use the synchrotron’s cutting-edge techniques. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, August 2012, pp 26-29.
Click here for pdf (2.5 Mb)

Big on the inside: the power of metal-organic frameworks

With walls a single atom thick and internal surface areas up to 10 000 square metres per gram, metal–organic frameworks have big potential applications that include storing hydrogen and methane to power vehicles and capturing carbon dioxide from coal-fired power stations. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, May 2012, pp 20-23.
Click here for pdf (1.2 Mb)

A new wave of synchrotron scientists

The room is dark. As you cautiously push open the door, you notice shadowy figures peering intently at computer screens. Piercing beams of red and green laser light dart along the benches towards detector screens that light up with complex diffraction patterns. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, November 2011, pp 32-6.
Click here for pdf (863 kb)

The drug designers

Drugs prescribed by medical professionals are big business. Drug development is a fragmented tale of hits, leads, reactions, protection and a molecule called Janet. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, August 2011, pp 26-30.
Click here for pdf (667 kb)

Thinking process gets results

Not just a pretty space, the Australian Synchrotron is being used to achieve industrially valuable outcomes: more-efficient and environmentally friendly mineral processing methods, specialised new equipment for biomedical research - and a battery that stores part of its charge in the air. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, February 2011, pp 32-6.
Click here for pdf (1004 kb) 

Something old, something new

Ancient Egyptian artefacts have long been a subject of fascination. We can’t ask their long-dead creators how they were made, but the Australian Synchrotron is the next best thing, providing new insights into the chemistry of ancient cultural items. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, November 2010, pp 20-7.
Click here for pdf (1382 kb) 

Finding the light perspective

Chemists are quickly realising the value of the tools the Australian Synchrotron has placed at their disposal. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, August 2010, pp 21-5.
Click here for pdf (647 kb)

My chemistry romance

Whether you’re hopelessly smitten or just passing through, chemistry can lead you down some surprising paths. Australian Synchrotron staff with chemistry qualifications don’t just do chemistry. They run the control room, develop new experimental capabilities, help external researchers carry out synchrotron experiments, provide administrative services, and write about science. Nancy Mills, Chemistry in Australia, April 2010, pp 17-21.
Click here for pdf (787 kb)